Tunnels Under the Old Almy’s and it’s Connection to the Salem Witch Hysteria and More!

Almy, Bigelow, & Washburn

The company was a town favorite in downtown Salem, operating on Essex Street in Salem from 1862 to 1985. Many fond memories are still recalled by locals who grew up shopping there with their parents. Could this famous store at its beginnings have received smuggled goods through the tunnels of Salem from Boston, Lowell, and Lawrence? Was this the first time this location was used for smuggling? First a little history of the famous store and the property’s history.

According to Helen Butler, who married a grandson of Almy’s founder recalls how the store began, “James Fergus Almy was a Quaker who came to Salem from North Adams and started a little store. Meanwhile, from Stowe, Vermont came Lurana Bigelow to Salem and she opened a millinery store. He fell in love with her and when he wanted money for the store, she had capital to give him. The union of Almy and Bigelow was forged when they married.”

Then Walter K. Bigelow became Almy’s business partner and the firm changed its name to James F. Almy & Co. Then around 1869, William G. Webber also became a partner and they renamed the store Almy, Bigelow & Webber, which it remained until Webber’s retirement in 1885. Then followed Calvin R. Annable and E. Augustus Washburn who worked their way up to become partners to make Almy, Bigelow & Washburn. The firm incorporated after the death of James F. Almy in April 1899, with Almy’s wife and daughter serving on the board.

The store was  sold it in 1951 to the Gorin family.

 

Almy’s opened with four employees in 1858 originally at 156 Essex St., then 2 years later moved to 188 Essex St. When they closed they had 75 employees. The Salem store was one of five Almy’s outlets that were closed following the sale of the Almy’s chain to the Stop and Shop Corporation on March 16th, 1985.

The business’ second location was within the West Block. Nathaniel West bought the John Turner III mansion that was built in 1748 next to the Peter Palfrey House, opposite Central Street in 1833. Turner was the one in the family who lost the House of 7 Gables to the Ingersolls in 1782. West bought the property from Judge Oliver. Judge Andrew Oliver (1731-1799) was a judge and scientist who corresponded with Benjamin Franklin and authored numerous scientific essays. His son Peter Oliver was a subscriber to the Salem Common Improvement Fund and one of the subscriber’s who went deranged before 1821. The Salem Common Improvement Fund was a ruse behind a public work project to extend tunnels throughout town and hide the dirt in the Common which had five ponds and a river running to the sea. In April 11, 1817 Peter Oliver went into his house on the corner of Liberty and Essex Street and set it on fire with himself inside, but he lived. I think only a hole remained called “Oliver’s Hole” remained for years in which children played in. It reminds me of the failed RCG Hotel on the corner of Washington and Dodge Streets. Nathaniel West opened the old Turner mansion as a tavern called “The Mansion house” in time for President Andrew Jackson’s visit.  West also bought the Gardener-Pingree House which is famous for the murder of Captain Joseph White in 1830 that inspired the game Clue and the story The Tell-Tale Heart. He had also owned the estate where the North Shore Mall resides now that he lost in a bloody divorce.

Jackson was in town in 1833 to meet with Stephen White on the Common in his home he bought in 1811. The house along with his uncle Joseph White’s home , the Gardner-Pingree House that Nathaniel West acquired, were bought from bribes from Baring Brothers Bank (working for the Bank of England) to create the Second Bank of the United States. Jackson was on a northern tour looking for support for his Bank War which would refuse an early renewal of the bank. The White’s held considerable shares in the bank and were going to suffer a loss; Jackson suffered from stomach ailments (Typhoid) and had to return to Washington early. James Knox Polk would suffer similar ailments as Speaker of the House under Jackson defending his stance on the future of the bank. Later Polk would die from Typhoid 3 months after leaving his tenure as president.

Later the Mansion House would be called the “West Block”. Jabez Baldwin, a Jeweler, who was also a Salem Common Improvement Subscriber had a business in the West Block.  In around 1850 the building burns down. Maybe in 1860 it was a new building ready for Almy’s to move in. In the picture above it looks like the building was made in 1859.

Further in the past we learn more information on this location that Almy’s occupied. Charles Wentworth Upham’s book “Salem Witchcraft,” published in 1867 states,“The ‘Ship Tavern’ was on the ground the front of which is occupied, at present, by ‘West’s Block,’ nearly opposite of the head of Central Street. It had long been owned and kept by John Gedney, Sr….John died in 1685. His widow moved into the family of her father-in-law; and, after his death in 1688, continued to keep house…The tavern, in 1692, was known as ‘Widow Gedney’s.’ The estate had an extensive orchard in the rear, contiguous, along its northern boundary, to the orchard of Bridget Bishop, which occupied ground now covered by the Lyceum building, and one or two others to the east of it.” The Ship Tavern was the defacto town hall. It was where the town already met, provided food and alcohol, and had more firewood in the winter than town hall. The Ship tavern led to the first death during the Witch Hysteria because the owner died leaving the property to his wife.

Born Sarah Warren, she married a prominent man by the name of Robert Prince. He was the brother of a woman who married into the prominent Putnam family who started the Witch Hysteria. Then Robert Prince died in 1674 leaving the tavern to her and the 150 acre farm next to the Putnam’s. His sister believed it should of gone to her and her father-in-law would of loved that acquisition and the influence it would of brought him in town. The widow then married Alexander Osborne, her Irish indentured manservant (who paid off his debt) causing a scandal. Sarah Osborne would be the first to die in jail in Boston from the Witch Hysteria.

Bridget Bishop would inherit a tavern from her second of three husbands, Thomas Oliver, which is on the site of the Salem Five Bank on the corner of Washington and Church Streets. Her orchard was behind that building and ran behind the Ship Tavern, who used to own the orchard under John Gedney Sr., on Essex Street. Now Turner’s Seafood sits in that old orchard on the site of the Lyceum that burned down when the Salem Boy’s Fraternity resided in it.

During the time of the Witch madness, a man had swore bewilderment had happened in his home and looked out of the window seeing Bridget Bishop running away through her orchard. The tale was probably a lie, but today real magic happens on this site for now it is the location of Coven’s Cottage and Angelica of the Angels. Both are psychic parlors and one is owned by real witches. Something that could only be found in Boxford, Ma in 1692.

Now back to tunnels; in the picture below you will see the foundations of these buildings after Almy’s was razed to build the Essex Condominiums and the retail stores below them. In the picture you can see the various bricks used to build the foundations of the Ship Tavern, John Turner III Mansion, and the West Block. In between these bricks you can see sections of bricks no wider than a hallway created with different building materials. These are the sealed tunnels that had led to this important seat of the town at various times.

Tunnels existed in Salem as far back as 1662 at least and around the time in 1655 that John Gedney (another Quaker) built the Ship Tavern on this location; could it have had tunnels connected to it at that time as well? John Turner I house, House of 7 Gables, was connected to tunnels; why would not his grandson keep up the tradition in 1742 when he built his mansion? Could this be a selling point for Nathaniel West who had previously owned the Gardner-Pingree house which famously depicts its secret passages on the board of the game Clue? He also owned his father-in-law’s wharf, Derby Wharf,  and warehouse that was connected to tunnels; it might seem a new home must be connected as a priority before he purchased it. West was also a Salem Common Improvement Fund subscriber. Could of President Jackson in 1833 walked from the Pickering, Mack, Stone House at 21-23 Chestnut Street (he visited Robert Stone who Jackson sent the USS Potomac to blow up Sumatra/Indonesia for, after natives raided one of his ships in 1832) to the Mansion House through the tunnel? Could of Jackson walked to Stephen White’s House also through the tunnel from the Mansion House? In 1860 the Salem Wharf’s were only being used for coal and lumber, but could Almy’s have received smuggled goods from Boston, Lowell, and Lawrence through the train tunnel built by George Peabody, of JP Morgan Bank fame, through the underground train station where Opus Underground is now from Boston? I believe so… What do you think? Tell me below in the comments.

So there is the various history of the store Salem locals loved and the history of the property that was connected to the smuggling tunnel of Salem, MA.

For more information on the tunnels read Salem Secret Underground: The History of the Tunnels in the City available at Barnes & Noble, Amazon.com, and other great booksellers like Wicked Good Books, Jolie Tea, The Witch House, and Remember Salem in town. Support local businesses!!!

 

 

I am President William Harrison

I am the First to Suffer Tecumseh’s Curse

William Henry Harrison

My son died 2 weeks before my inauguration and I died a month after. You might believe I died from pneumonia a month after exposure to a snowstorm speech I had made. I was assassinated by Senators Henry Clay and Daniel Webster for my refusal for banking a third national bank. I was poisoned by typhoid; the same as Polk and Taylor! The first to suffer Tecumseh’s Curse…

Read Sub Rosa by Chris Dowgin published by Salem House Press!

Strange Connections: James Taylor, The Game Clue, Opium, and Presidential Assassination?

It all starts with salmonella and a good game of Clue

Around August 12th, 1849 in Meadville, Pennsylvania on a northern tour of the country President Zachary Taylor would suffer from typhoid for 3 days and recover. In April 1850 he would dine with William H. Prescott who he tried to convince to write a history of the Mexican-War. Out of spite Prescott would write the Conquest of Mexico…about Cortez and his friends instead.

I wonder about Prescott. He had dined with Polk before he died. Polk had been sick afterward, but survived. Prescott would be a great spy. He had access to John Quincy Adams, James Polk, Arthur Wellington, Prince Albert, and Zachary Taylor. Prince Albert would die of typhoid as well. Two years after Prescott’s death though. Taylor would become sick 3 months after meeting Prescott, I believe typhoid incubates for a week or two? Can it lay dormant longer? Zachary Taylor would be the second of the only two Whig candidates who were elected president, and the second to die early in their term of Typhoid. The first was William Harrison who died within a month of his inauguration, and under 2 months of his son’s death.

Daniel Webster a character in Sub Rosa.
Daniel Webster. His son marries Stephen White’s daughter and his brother-in-law marries the other daughter. Webster prosecuted innocent men for Stephen White to get away with murdering his uncle. The two would go on to assassinate President Harrison.

Now Stephen White was the power behind Daniel Webster who was 1 of 3 of the most powerful senators in the country. Webster was the prosecutor in the Joseph White murder, the uncle of Stephen. Stephen got away with the murder and then engineered the assassination of William Harrison with Daniel Webster and Henry Clay. The Joseph White murder is the basis of the Parker Brother’s choice to purchase the American rights to the English game Cluedo and rename it Clue. What spur this? A grand uncle of the Parker Brothers was the judge in the murder case who dies the night before the trial started.

Now as Prescott was leaving Boston for Washington to dine with Taylor the famous Webster-Parkman trial was happening. Lemuel Shaw was the State Superior Court Justice on the case. He was the man Webster appointed to the position of Chief Justice after he possibly murdered Chief Justice Parker.  Parker previously presided over a hung jury libel case Webster brought against someone who claimed he was a traitor during the Hartford Convention. Since Shaw heard the case for Selman and Chase who were acquitted in the White murder previously he could not hear the murder case against the  Knapps. He was also married to a Knapp. So it proved a horrible choice for Webster to make. Also the Knapp’s attorney was the same defense attorney from the libel case.

Parkman Webster Murder illustration

Now the suspect in the John Parkman murder was John White Webster. Daniel Webster was asked to prosecute the case. Did Daniel Webster refuse the case because to many memories of the Captain Joseph White murder case in Salem? The suspect had White and Webster in his name. The judge, Lemuel Shaw, was his first choice for the White murder, after the Parker murder that was.

Parker. Parkman? It does sound eerily familiar. Was Webster hearing the tell tail heart? Especially if he was sending his youthful friend to poison a president. Prescott’s father was another traitor during the Hartford Convention with Daniel Webster. This would be the first assassination after the mysterious death of Stephen White after an accidental poisoning,  second if you include Polk who had left office already. Stephen White was behind the assassination of Harrison with Webster and Clay.

Now Prescott had just spent time with Parkman’s son at the time of the murder. Also Prescott’s aunt was married to John White Webster. Parkman and John White Webster were teachers at Harvard.

Parkman helped create the McLean Asylum which is now in Belmont, MA. He would also testify at the Abraham Prescott murder which tried using sleepwalker as a defense in the murder. He was testifying that insanity can be genetically passed along, since Abraham Prescott close family were all nuts. It was Daniel Webster’s friend Rufus Choate who first successfully used sleepwalking as a defense in American history in 1846. Choate convinced a jury that the accused, Albert Tirrell, did not cut the throat of his lover, or, if he did so, he did it while sleepwalking, under the ‘ insanity of sleep’.

John White Webster had murdered Parkman and dismantled his corpse and tried burning him in the Harvard’s incinerator.

Trivia. Lemuel Shaw’s daughter Elizabeth marries Herman Melville. He presided over Cobb Vs Cobb in which Brigham Young was having affair with Augusta Adams and Henry Adams wins a divorce. Brigham Young will be at Nathaniel Felt’s house in Salem when he hears news of Joseph Smith’s death. Felt was married to John Quincy Adam’s cousin. Shaw was married to Elizabeth Knapp who was the daughter of Josiah Knapp. George Parkman’s sister married Robert Gould Shaw, grandfather of 54th regiment Robert Gould Shaw (the general Matthew Broderick played in Glory). Also Nathaniel Russell Sturgis was married to Susannah Parkman. Maybe they all bought to much opium from Sturgis.

Sturgis was in the employment of Thomas Perkins’ opium empire which made his Forbes nephews a fortune andthe drug empire was  later sold to the Russells, the family who founded the Skull & Bones.

McLean Asylum later would house Ray Charles, James Taylor, and John Nash. Ray Charles and James Taylor would be addicts of a form of opium…

I bet you had no clue…

For more information on tunnels in Salem and how the city shaped American history read Sub Rosa and Salem Secret Underground: The HIstory of the Tunnels in the City. Available at Barnes & Noble, Amazon.com, and anywhere books are sold! Also eBooks available at www.salemhousepress.com. Also take the Salem Smugglers’ Tour when in Salem MA to learn this all first hand from the author.
Sub Rosa Book CoverSSU2

Parker Brother’s Clue and the Murder of Two Presidents

Daniel Webster Murdered Two Presidents.
Daniel Webster. The inspiration of Sam the Eagle from the Muppets.

Re-branding and the Importance of History Today!

OK, what would you say if I can connect re-branding the game Cluedo, the First National Bank of the United States, George Peabody & Co.,  Panic of 1837, cherries and milk, and the 1841 Bankruptcy Act to Clue, The Federal Reserve, JP Morgan Chase, 2008 Financial Collapse, three presidential assassinations, and The Capital Purchase Program? Why do I ask, if you do not know the answer to this question history only repeats itself. Now let me show you…

 

In Salem the ghastly murder of Captain Joseph White is still remembered. Every time you go buy a tour on Essex Street you can catch a guide telling the tale once more. For most of us we only know of the story from the popular Parker Brothers game Clue which incorporates a Mrs. White and basis the rooms on the board on the house Mr. White was murdered in. Yes, another house attached to tunnels. This was the re-branding of an English game called Cluedo.

A little background. Joseph White was insulted throughout his life by two business partners, Joseph Knapp Sr. and Richard Crowninshield Sr. One had lost his favorite ship called the Revenge to the Pirate Philips and had his namesake marry his niece he was trying to have a child with. The second gentleman had insulted him publicly after the Embargo Act was lifted when three ships were captured by the French general Marat in Naples. Richard’s I told you so did not go over to well.

So to get his Revenge, Joseph White had his nephew Stephen White murder him while he was on his death bed and blame the children of those two business partners who he thought had done him wrong. Stephen White who had lost his wife and mother in 1827, the same year Joseph Knapp Jr. had married his cousin away from his uncle. Stephen White would have 27 men hunt down the murderer and proposed a $2,700 reward for their apprehension. Also 3 months after the murder State Superior Court Justice Parker, the Parker Brothers uncle, would die mysteriously before presiding on the case. It was three years since the deaths of Stephen White’s mother and wife.

Stephen White will pay Daniel Webster $1,000 to try not only Joseph Knapp Jr. and Richard Crowninshield Jr. but also Joseph’s brother Frank. Richard would die by his own silk handkerchiefs from a low window with his knees almost touching the ground in his cell and the other two Webster would see hanged.  White’s daughter married Webster’s first wife’s half brother and his other daughter had married Webster’s son. Daniel Webster the drunken gambler would always be in the debt of Stephen White who who was on the board of the Salem Savings Bank and owned the Asiatic Bank. Webster would also be in the debt of Riggs in Washington who was an agent for George Peabody. Lincoln and many other politicians would owe Riggs a fortune.

Henry-Clay
Henry Clay.

Daniel Webster who along with Henry Clay was the head of the Whig Party and the opposition to President Jackson. The Whigs originally called the National Republicans were a re-branding of the Federalists who dug tunnels in Salem in opposition to Jefferson’s custom duties, and painted their chimneys white and black. White and black chimneys at one time were a sign of loyal Tories supporting England. The major goal of the Federalists were the creation of the First Bank of the United States a private bank that was heavily invested into by London bankers who cashed in on securities or bonds given to the soldiers in lieu of pay that defeated them during the Revolutionary War they had gained by purchasing them for pennies on the dollar.

The Whigs were in a battle over the Second Bank of the United States. Daniel Webster was on the board of the Boston Branch of The Second Bank of the United States did not appreciate Jackson’s refusal to renew the bank’s charter in 1836. Jackson claimed the bank took money away from the Common Man and had placed too much of our capital and debt into the hands of English bankers. Rothschild who was heavily invested in state securities in which George Peabody sold him approved of several loans in America and then reversed direction by stopping the flow of currency and then called in many of those debts prematurely. The combination of events created the Panic of 1837.

In response many of the states reneged on payments of their debts to London bankers. In hopes of having the states pay back these securities Daniel Webster had hoped war hero Benjamin Harrison once in office would bring forth the Third Bank of the United States. This was not to happen.

William_Henry_Harrison_daguerreotype_edit
President William Harrison

Whigs like Henry Clay and Daniel Webster had hoped Harrison would be their puppet. But this was not going to be so. Daniel Webster had wrote an inaugural address for Harrison in March of 1841, which he rejected for his own that lasted an hour and forty five minutes, which is the longest in history, during a snow storm. This irked Webster. It irked him so much that he used it as the cause of death of the president a month later.

Harrison also shunned Clay telling him that all future correspondences should be done in writing since he banned Clay from the White House. A few days later, however, Treasury Secretary Thomas Ewing reported to Harrison that federal funds were in such trouble that the government could not continue to operate until Congress’ regularly scheduled session in December; Harrison thus relented, and on March 17 proclaimed the special session in the interests of  “the condition of the revenue and finance of the country”. The session was scheduled to begin on May 31.

At the session, Clay offered six resolutions as a plan of work for Congress. These proposed putting an end to the independent treasury, the establishment of a new national bank, and a tax increase on imports. They also included a new plan to give the states the money received by the federal government from the sale of public lands. Clay represented an agrarian elite that was at odds not only with Harrison, but also Webster and his clan of seaboard New England merchants. The tax increase on imports was to pull on Webster’s beard. His political base in Massachusetts were the same people who built three miles of tunnels to avoid paying Jefferson’s duties on imports. Clay knew full well about this, especially after conversations and walks he shared with Webster and John Quincy Adams through Joseph Bonaparte’s tunnels in Bordentown, NJ.  Harrison would have nothing to do with any of them. Four days later Harrison would be dead.

On March 26th, Harrison would begin to feel ill. Webster would blame this on his long speech during the snow storm, but Harrison did not show signs of a being sick till 3 weeks later. Harrison started to complain about a stomach bug. He had been dealing with dyspepsia for years and thought it was another outbreak and nothing more. Although we have no record of how he managed his dyspepsia, the standard treatment in the 1840s was carbonated alkali, which would have neutralized the gastric acid that otherwise kills harmful bacteria. In the absence of the gastric acid barrier, gastroenteritis can be caused by as few as one ten-thousandth the number of bacteria usually needed. By April 4th Harrison was dead.

Dr. Thomas Miller had given  him a host of toxic medications that were then considered the standard of care — including opium, which retards the intestine’s ability to rid itself of microbial pathogens, facilitating their invasion into the bloodstream. Enemas, which Miller repeatedly gave to Harrison, are also potentially dangerous in such patients. They can perforate ulcers produced by S. typhi and S. paratyphi in the ileum, the lower end of the small intestine, through which the bacteria would be able to  escape from the intestine into the bloodstream, resulting in sepsis. In 2014 a medical analysis had determined that Harrison had died of Typhoid which brought about pneumonia and not from his long speech during a snow storm 3 weeks prior.

In Washington D.C. the “night soil” from chamber pots and other collections of sewage was within range of leaking into the cities water supply. These situations would of resulted in cholera and typhoid deaths in the region that Miller had access to. The first time in recorded American history disease was used to kill an enemy can be recorded in 1764 at the Siege of Fort Pitt when the British purposefully gave members of the Delaware tribe blankets and a handkerchief infected by smallpox. It would not be beyond Harrison’s contemporaries to use typhoid or cholera infected food or water along with his dyspepsia complicated with the enema, opium, and carbonated alkali. It is said that typhoid takes 3 to 4 weeks to run its course and then either you survived or your dead. Cholera would take 1 to five days. Harrison had died within a month of taking office and 8 days after reporting to Miller his sickness.

Is there a history of people being murdered by typhoid? In antiquity it was rumored Alexander the Great was poisoned by typhoid in his food. Dr. Hyde Benet Clark would use a mixture of cyanide, strychnine, and typhoid to wipe out his wife’s relatives to he her aunt’s fortune. Lydia Southard in 1915 would kill 4 husbands and some of their relatives with Typhoid. Arthur Warren Waite in 1916 spiked a can of tuna fish with typhoid to kill his mother-in-law and used barbital to help her along.

Did Harrison’s death do Webster and Clay any good in the restoration of a semi private bank of the United States? No. In a turn of events that was not going to be seen until Theodore Roosevelt would succeed after McKinley’s assassination, Tyler would go on to veto the creation of the Third Bank of the United States on August 16th which led to riots by Whig members on the White House. After this it was seen as prudent to create the first police force in the capital. The Second Bank of the United States which had been acting as a totally private organization run by bankers in London finally gave up its ghost soon afterward.  Webster’s position as director of the Boston branch came to an end as well.

President-Tyler
President Tyler.

After the second veto by Tyler on September 11th, Henry Clay in hopes of having Tyler resign had the majority of Tyler’s cabinet, not including Webster who he was quarreling with, remove themselves. Tyler then gained support with the Democrats who were promising him the next election. Andrew Jackson writes a letter applauding Tyler in his decision. In modern history September 11th can be seen as the crowning moment of George W. Bush’s presidency which culminated in the successful re-branding of his father’s and brother’s Saving and Loan Scandal and its bail out in 2008.

But what was gained was the distribution to the states of the proceeds of public-land sales for a short period before repealed which netted the states $600,000. This would of provided the states the money needed to pay back their securities they defaulted on that the Second Bank of the United States and London bankers like George Peabody and Nathan Rothschild held. Also Tyler enacted the Bankruptcy Act of 1841 that bailed out the banks and investors who suffered after Jackson’s veto of the Second Bank of the United States in 1836 which led to the panic the next year. 33,000 cases were heard during a short period of time, which flooded docket courts, before it was repealed. Edgar Allan Poe tried to use his minor connections to Tyler to to be declared bankrupt which failed. Judge Story, Webster’s wife’s uncle defended it in the Superior Court. It was the grandfather party of the Whigs, the Federalists, in 1800 that secured the first bail out or Bankruptcy bill which Jefferson repealed in 1803.

Also in the year of 1841 Stephen White’s brother-in-law and father-in-law to his son Daniel Fletcher White had died.  Stephen White, the financier behind Webster and the man who brought him into conspiracies of murder has died. How much did Stephen White have to do with the assassination of Harrison is to be further pursued in the new book Subrosa. Is it a coincidence that the man openly who presided over Webster had no true power and the man behind the scenes who pulled his strings for so many years would die in the same year?

Now in 1850 Webster would be called away from his lucrative law practice in Boston to be once more Secretary of State. This time for another Whig president, Millard Filmore. To offset his losses from leaving behind his law practice a cohort of international bankers, and probably some from Massachusetts, had set up a fund of $20,000 for Webster to draw from.

Another reason Webster took the position was that he ruined his career with his northern supporters after his “Seventh of March Speech” which lasted three and a half hours, quite short for a man who once spoke for five hours after an extra special dinner. In that speech in March he called for the preservation of the union at all costs, rallied against his abolitionist supporters, and said that the slaves in the south experienced better working conditions than free workers in the north. Webster also contended that there is no cause to complain about the continuation of slavery where it already existed and he believed there was no fear of extending slavery into the parched areas of  the southwest. In fact most people who ventured west had given up before the five year mark of obtaining a title grant out west because they could not meet the necessary yield in farming needed due to the lack of rain.  He also said that the south deserved protection of their property and he urged for stronger slave fugitive laws. We are called to mention once more that his adviser Stephen White had practiced within his uncle’s slave trade. Captain Joseph White had once said that he would sell anyone no matter what color they were. Horace Mann and Ralph Waldo Emerson levied abuse to him in New England papers and helped ruin any future political career in New England he had at one time. In spite of this he looked forward to winning the presidency after Taylor…

Taylor
President Zachary Taylor

His opposition against Taylor had cost him his career. There were plenty of others who wished the president dead. Taylor had threatened to hang anyone who would go after secession on the slavery issue in the new territories. On July 4th during the dedication of the Washington Monument Taylor got overheated and then shocked his system by consuming copious quantities of iced milk and cold cherries which would bring about his death on the 7th. Gastroenteritis again, just like what Harrison suffered, caused by the highly acidic cherries combined with fresh milk (I know in my case milk coats my stomach when I have indigestion..) Supposedly the milk and cherries brought on a bilious fever, typhoid, and cholera morbus (a general term for bacterial infection of the lower colon.) resulting in debilitating diarrhea which is a nutritive expulsion and dehydration coupled with  a buildup of excretive acids in bowels and intestines.  Typhoid or cholera poisoning once again. Taylor lasted 16 months in office. Fifteen months longer than Harrison his Whig compatriot.

By the way, Webster served out the rest of his life as Secretary of State till 1852 and dies the same year as Henry Clay.

Some history books still mention the deaths of the only two elected presidents from the Whig party as one got too cold and died and the other got to hot and died from drinking milk and eating cherries. A third would  include Lincoln who was a Whig that joined the newly formed Republican Party.

By the way Polk would also die 3 months after leaving office from cholera in 1849, 13 months before Taylor.

During Polk’s presidency he restored the Independent Treasury System that Harrison disbanded for the Whigs before his death. This ran up against their constant desire to establish the Third Bank of the United States.  It also stood up for Jackson’s  hard money stance against the Whigs. It lasted until 1913 when the Federal Reserve was created.

The Fiscal Bank of the United States was passed by Congress in 1841. Tyler vetoed it believing it was an vague attempt of re-branding the Third Bank of the United States under a new name.  It is a miracle what re-branding can do. You take a pile of horse shit and re-brand it manure and you can make a fortune. In 1913 this is what many think the London bankers did when they help institute the private bank called the Federal Reserve.

At the beginning of this article I had said I could show you the importance of history by showing you how  the tunnel digging Federalist in Salem who supported strong ties to London and their bankers through Peabody, Morgan & Co. re-branded themselves Republicans, to be called Whigs, and Republicans once again had conspired in the creation of a series of National Banks of the United States through the murder of 3 presidents, engineered by the director of their Boston Branch and his financier,  within their own party to have the majority of the nation’s finance in the hands of English banks that have engineered panics, depressions, financial collapses, and bailouts.

Financial collapse? JP Morgan Chase and Morgan Stanley have been fined recently for engineering the 2008 Financial Collapse. George Peabody, the friend of Nathan Rothschild, the man that bailed out the Brown Brothers who have been influential in the Republican presidencies of both Bushes, the person who rescued Stephen White’s failing museum is re-branded today as JP Morgan Chase and Morgan Stanley.

Bail Out? In 1841 the Bankruptcy Act rescued those merchants working for London bankers in America after Jackson refusal to renew the Second Bank of the United States charter in 1836 which led to the  plan in which Nathan Rothschild and Peabody bankrupted America during the Panic of 1837. Bankruptcy Act was re-branded the 2008 Bail Out that rescued JP Morgan Chase, Morgan Stanley, Bank of New York (Alexander Hamilton’s bank who created the First Bank of the United States.), and a bank now called Bank of America (no relation).

So history is important, for it keeps repeating itself if we are not careful through re-branding. So remember my statement of manure; no matter what you call it, it still smells like a honey pot.

p.s. If you think this ending is grasping at straws, well it is intended to leave you wanting more. A more thorough explanation will be given within the new book “Subrosa” which is the sequel to “Salem Secret Underground: The History of the Tunnels in the City” which is available on Amazon and soon Barnes & Noble.