Vintage Salem Morning

Welcome to another Vintage Salem Posts. Every Wednesday we will post another image from our home town’s past. If you have any other images of the buildings or locations we offer each Wednesday, please share them below.

Paramount Theater Salem MA

Paramount Theater on Essex Street

Now this is the location of the East India Mall. This theater was gorgeous with a Wurlitzer organ which would rise out of the floor to play music for the silent films.

Cheers,
Chris
Owner Salem House Press

Elenore Abbott: Illustrator of the Week

Once Upon a Tale…

Abbott, known for her book illustrations, was also a landscape and portrait painter and scenic designer,[5] including work for Hedgerow Theatre‘s production of The Emperor Jones.[4] She produced illustrations for Harper’s Magazine, the Saturday Evening Post,[4] and Scribner’s magazines.[4][6] Abbott created illustrations for books, such as Robert Louis Stevenson‘s Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Johann David Wyss‘s Swiss Family Robinson, Louisa May Alcott‘s Old Fashioned Girl, and the Grimm’s Fairy Tales.[4]

Gallery:

Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elenore_Abbott

Extended Gallery:

http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/illustrations/illustrators/abbottelenore.html

I AM HENRY CLAY

Welcome to tales of Nineteenth-Century Salem. A time in which Salem was the richest city and the most influential in shaping our young country. In our posts you will learn how Salem has shaped American history from the profits she made by the smuggling that happened in her tunnels by the most wealthy and powerful in their day; sometimes for the good, but more often not. So join us every Monday for new tales!

Henry Clay

I WAS ONE OF THE THREE MOST POWERFUL SENATORS, BUT YOU DON’T REMEMBER ME

I first came to Salem to advise a rope maker on the advantages of hemp. Once in town, I met John Quincy Adams and became his Secretary of State. I also met Daniel Webster who was one of the Triumphant of senators with me. We plotted and got away with assassinating 3 presidents trying to make the third national bank.

For more info read Sub Rosa to find out how Salem shaped America and your lives! Available at Remember Salem, Jolie Tea, Wicked Good Books, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon.com.

Snowy Days and Salem Tunnels

Welcome to the Salem Tunnel Report. Every Monday we will post new and old tunnel finds along with those who built them. In our posts you will learn how Salem has shaped American history from the profits of the smuggling that happened in these tunnels; sometimes for the good, but more often not.

Not all secrets are well hid…

Next time there is a lite flurry or the snow is melting after a deluge…take a walk on Front Street, Derby Square, or Essex Street and look for these crescent shapes of melted snow. See the heat that escapes from the basements in these buildings escape through the tunnel entrances and melts the sidewalk above them. They could not hide everything. Sometimes it is just simple science that gets us in trouble…

For more read Salem Secret Underground: The History of the Tunnels in the City and its sequel Sub Rosa by Chris Dowgin published by Salem House Press. Available at Barnes & Noble, Remember Salem, The Witch House, Jolie Tea, and Amazon.com.

Vintage Salem Morning

Welcome to another Vintage Salem Posts. Every Wednesday we will post another image from our home town’s past. If you have any other images of the buildings or locations we offer each Wednesday, please share them below.

Dixon Chapel and Greenhouse in Greenlawn Cemetery

Greenlawn Cemetery, Chapel, and Greenhouse. Under this chapel 4 tunnels meet. One heading out to Orne’s Point where the Widow Orne sold bricks to keep her property to be used to create the tunnels in Salem. Her kin Secretary of State Timothy Pickering bought 40,000 bricks from her in one order when a house only needed 8,000 bricks.

For more info read Sub Rosa by Chris Dowgin available at Remember Salem, Jolie Tea, Wicked Good Books, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon.com.

Cheers,
Chris
Owner Salem House Press

Vintage Salem

Welcome to another Vintage Salem Posts. Every Wednesday we will post another image from our home town’s past. If you have any other images of the buildings or locations we offer each Wednesday, please share them below.

Salem Armory

Salem Armory on Essex Street

Salem Armory on Essex Street. A favorite with many people in Salem. Burned down by someone who hated religions. This was burned down because Laurie Cabot held her Witch Balls here. He also burned the top floor of the Mason Lodge, St. Anne’s Church, and an out building on the La Salette Shrine in Ipswich.

Cheers,
Chris
Owner Salem House Press

Coles Phillips: Illustrator of the Week

Simultaneous Contrast?

The work of Phillips quickly became popular with the Life readers. In May 1908, he created a cover for the magazine that featured his first “fadeaway girl” design with a figure whose clothing matched, and disappeared into, the background.[5][6] Phillips developed this idea in many subsequent covers.

Phillips’ use of negative space allowed the viewer to “fill-in” the image; it also reduced printing costs for the magazine, as “the novelty of the technique and the striking design qualities masked the fact that Life was getting by with single color or two-color covers in a day when full-color covers were de rigueur for the better magazines”.[2] Phillips worked in watercolor and always painted from life; according to his biographer, Michael Schau, “he refused to work from photographs or to use the pantograph“.[7]

Phillips produced cover art for other national magazines besides Life, including Good Housekeeping, which for two years (beginning in July 1912) made him their sole cover artist.[8] Phillips also created many advertising images for makers of women’s clothing, and for such clients as the Overland automobile company and Oneida Community flatware. His series depicting women wearing Holeproof Hosiery products was considered daring for its time.[9] Phillips’ works also appear in the 1921 and 1922 editions of the U. S. Naval Academy yearbook, Lucky Bag.

Gallery:

Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coles_Phillips

Extended Gallery:

http://www.americanartarchives.com/phillips,c.htm